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The definitive ranking of Norway's Olympic curling pants

Norway men's curling team
AP

The definitive ranking of Norway's Olympic curling pants

Somebody had to do it

Fun fact – Norway’s curling team brought 11 different pairs of pants to the PyeongChang Games. A new design for each game, with two extra in case the team made it to the semifinals and medal rounds.

Norway has become known over the years for their bright and colorful pants, which are probably more popular than the team’s actual curling skills.

But which pair of pants are the best? During the PyeongChang games we saw a holiday themed pair, intense polka dots, Hawaiian flowers, fireworks, and a lovely paisley print, among others. Even though Norway struggled on the ice, failing to make the semifinals, their britches have all been winners. But in the Olympic spirit, one pair must be the best. With that in mind, here are Norway’s best pants, from worst to best.

First, the ground rules. Pants will be ranked on the following criteria:

  1. Creativity – it has to be a pair of pants no one else would think to create (or wear, let's be honest).
  2. Design – how pretty are they?
  3. How well the pair goes with the shirt – this is important.  Pretty pants are only perfect pretty pants when they pair well with a pretty shirt. This is the No. 1 rule of fashion.
  4. National pride – Norway’s flag is red, white and blue, and since the pants are technically the national team’s uniforms, they should represent the country well.

The rankings:

Ninth place – large polka dots



CURLING-OLY-2018-PYEONGCHANG-NOR-KOR

Norway's Haavard Vad Petersson throws the stone during the curling men's round robin session between Norway and South Korea during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Curling Centre in Gangneung on February 16. Credit: Getty Images

These pants fit the national pride theme very well, and are a nice throwback to the 1970’s. I feel like I saw something similar on an episode of the Brady Bunch.

However, the design is off in many ways. The sides of the pants where the fabric is sewn didn’t match up, making a lot of the dots not full circles or the same color. Also, these pants probably should have been paired with white shirts. The shirts the team chose that day had triangle designs on them, which clashed with the dots. It was a good attempt, but honestly the team had better.

Eighth place – Valentines



Norway curling

Norway men's curling team wear pants with heart-shape prints during their men's curling match against Japan at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018. Credit: AP

These pants make sense, given they were worn on Valentines day, so points for creativity and timeliness, but they definitely don't fit the national pride theme, or match the red shirts the team wore that day.

Seventh place – psychedelic swirls



Norway curling

Norway's skip Thomas Ulsrud, right, watches teammates sweep the ice during a men's curling match against Britain at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. Credit: AP

Norway proved to be big fans of the psychedelic look, but of their 60's inspired prints, they had better.

Sixth place – psychedelic flowers



CURLING-OLY-2018-PYEONGCHANG-USA-NOR

Norway's Torger Nergard throws the stone during the curling men's round robin session between the US and Norway during the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at the Gangneung Curling Centre in Gangneung on February 18, 2018. Credit: Getty Images

These are a much better presentation when it comes to the 60's prints. Plus, they go well with the triangles on the team's shirts. Props for wearing white shirts with the mostly red pants, too.

Fifth place – Hawaiian flowers



Norway curling

Norway men's curling team sweep ice during their match against Canada at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 15, 2018. Credit: AP

These pants were to be expected, given that if you're going to wear something loud, Hawaiian print is typically a go-to. But these flowers look great on the blue background, especially with the red shirt.

Fourth place – fireworks



Curling - Winter Olympics Day 9

GANGNEUNG, SOUTH KOREA - FEBRUARY 18: A detailed view of the pants or trousers worn by Havard Vad Petersson, Christoffer Svae, Thomas Ulsrud and Torger Nergaard of Norway as they speak during the Curling round robin session 7 on day nine of the PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games at Gangneung Curling Centre on February 18, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. Credit: Getty Images

I have no idea what to call these pants. They sort of look like fireworks, but more importantly they're very creative and very pretty.

Bronze – large flowers



Norway curling

Norway's skip Thomas Ulsrud holds his broom during a men's curling match against Italy at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. Credit: AP

Of the two flower prints, this is better. The flowers are four different colors so you can't actually tell what color pants these are, which is impressive.

Silver – paisley print



Norway curling

Norway's Torger Nergaard, center, sweeps ice with his teammate during their men's curling match against Switzerland at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Saturday, Feb. 17, 2018. Credit: AP

This paisley really is lovely, especially paired with the white shirt.

Gold – Norway flag



Norway curling

Norway's Christoffer Svae drops his stick during a break at their men's curling match against Sweden at the 2018 Winter Olympics in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. Credit: AP

These pants check all the boxes. They’re creative, they’re different, they’re paired with a white shirt, which is key because if they chose these with the red shirt they run the risk of looking like curling Santa Clauses, which isn’t a good look. Also, they literally scream Norway pride. Perfection in every sense of the word, and the perfect way for Norway to finish their games.

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