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USA Today Sports
1/14
1. Wescott triumphs
Snowboard cross made its Olympic debut at the 2006 Torino Games with American Seth Wescott narrowly defeating Radoslav Zidek of Slovakia in the big final to claim the inaugural gold medal.
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USA Today Sports
2/14
2. Jacobellis's mistake
One of the favorites entering the 2006 Games, American Lindsey Jacobellis ended up making headlines for the wrong reasons. Opening up a massive lead in the big final, Jacobellis decided to go for a method air - a pretty basic trick considered one of the most stylish in the world of snowboarding - on the second-to-last jump, but the early celebration cost her when she caught an edge and crashed. Jacobellis gave up the lead and would return home with the silver medal instead.
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USA Today Sports
3/14
3. Frieden capitalizes
Lindsey Jacobellis's mistake was Tanja Frieden's gain. Riding for Switzerland, Frieden seemed to have second place sewn up before Jacobellis's crash gave her a second chance at victory. Frieden (#4, left) stormed past Jacobellis (#3, right), who was still trying to get back up to speed, on the final jump and cruised to the finish line for a gold medal at the 2006 Torino Olympics.
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USA Today Sports
4/14
4. Back-to-back
At the 2010 Vancouver Games, Seth Wescott (right) made it two-for-two at the Olympics, remaining the only rider to earn the right to be called an Olympic gold medalist in men's snowboard cross. He had to come from last-to-first in the big final and crossed the finish line just barely ahead of Canada's Mike Robertson.
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USA Today Sports
5/14
5. Holland's heartbreak
The U.S. missed out on having a second rider on the podium at the 2010 Vancouver Games when Nate Holland (blue bib, 2nd from left) ultimately crashed in the big final while riding in 2nd place. Despite being one of the sport's elite racers, a gold medal has eluded Holland in each of his first two attempts.
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