Overview

Olympic bouts for both the men’s and women’s tournaments last three rounds, with each round lasting three minutes.

Five judges watch the bout and award points for what they deem to be successful hits. A referee can end a match at his or her discretion if the difference between fighters is such that they decide the match should not continue, or if a doctor indicates the match should be stopped.

A match can also end if the competitor receives three warnings (which results in disqualification), or if a competitor is unable to resume a fight within 10 seconds (in which case they are considered knocked out)

Within each weight class, a single-elimination tournament determines the medalists. The two semifinal winners meet to determine gold and silver, while the semifinal losers both receive bronze medals.

Weight Classes

Boxing at the Tokyo Games will comprise 13 medal events, eight for men and five for women.

The 2012 London Games were the first to include women’s boxing. The five women’s weight classes for Tokyo will be:

  • Flyweight (112 lbs/51 kg)
  • Featherweight (125 lbs/57 kg)
  • Lightweight (132 lbs/60 kg)
  • Welterweight (152 lbs/69 kg)
  • Middleweight (165 lbs/75 kg)

The eight men’s weight classes for Tokyo will be:

  • Flyweight (114 lbs/52 kg)
  • Featherweight (125 lbs/57 kg)
  • Lightweight (138 lbs/63 kg)
  • Welterweight (152 lbs/69 kg)
  • Middleweight (165 lbs/75 kg)
  • Light Heavyweight (178 lbs/81 kg)
  • Heavyweight (200 lbs/91 kg)
  • Super Heavyweight (+200 lbs/+91 kg)

The United States is the most prolific medal-winning nation, with 114 total. Cuba is second with 73.

Americans of note to win Olympic medals in boxing include:

  • Muhammad Ali — gold, 1960 (as Cassius Clay)
  • Joe Frazier — gold, 1964
  • George Foreman — gold, 1968
  • Leon Spinks — gold in 1976
  • Michael Spinks — gold in 1976
  • Evander Holyfield — bronze, 1984
  • Riddick Bowe — silver, 1988
  • Roy Jones, Jr. — silver, 1988
  • Oscar De La Hoya– gold in 1992
  • Floyd Mayweather — bronze, 1996
  • Claressa Shields — gold, 2012 and 2016

 

More information:

Official Tokyo site – Boxing

USA Boxing

International Boxing Association