This is how scoring works for snowboard big air, halfpipe and slopestyle at the 2022 Beijing Olympic Winter Games.

Halfpipe

Each halfpipe run is scored by a team of six judges. After dropping the highest and lowest scores, the four remaining scores are averaged together for each run. 

All judges score the runs based on overall impression, with each judge giving a score ranging from 1-100. In giving their marks, judges consider several different criteria, including:

  • Amplitude: This is basically another word for "height." Riders can add a lot of energy to their runs by boosting big airs out of the superpipe. Judges will reward athletes who can not only go big on their first hit, but can also maintain good amplitude throughout their entire run. 
  • Difficulty: The technical difficulty of tricks is assessed. Generally speaking, tricks with more rotation or more inverts are considered more technically difficult and will be rewarded as such. But there are other ways riders can increase the difficulty of a particular trick. For example, an athlete may decide to take off switch or spin uphill (known as an "alley-oop" spin) when executing a trick, or they may decide to do a more challenging grab to differentiate themselves from other riders in the field. 
  • Variety: Riders are expected to showcase a diverse mix of tricks. One of the most important ways a rider can show variety is in the way they spin when executing tricks. There are four possible directions in which a snowboarder can spin: frontside, backside, switch frontside (most commonly called "cab") and switch backside. (In other words, athletes can either spin frontside or backside, and they can do this while riding either forward or switch.) When mapping out a run, athletes will often plan it in a way that allows them to perform as many of those spins as possible. Another way that riders can show variety is in their grabs. Rather than doing the same grab on every single trick, athletes will frequently mix it up. 
  • Execution: This refers to the stability, fluidity and control of the tricks performed. Were the grabs held properly and for a long enough period of time? How smooth were the landings? Did the rider drag their hand across the ground at any point? How much "style" was evident in the run? These are all among the considerations of the judges. 
  • Progression: Riders are rewarded for introducing new tricks or for linking together tricks in a way that has never been done before.

There is no true universal consensus on "deductions" or how to determine an exact score. More than anything, scores are a means to an end – a way for judges to accurately position athletes on the leaderboard. Scoring is based on how athletes stack up against each other on that particular day, rather than being based on a strict mathematical formula or even past history.

For example, the very first athlete to compete might sometimes receive what's deemed to be a "low" score, relatively speaking. This is simply because judges, who have to evaluate the run they just witnessed against theoretical runs they think might occur later on, need to leave themselves cushioning to account for other competitors — in other words, you will likely never see a rider score a perfect 100 unless they are the final athlete to take a run. Because of this, scores from two different contests, whether it's between rounds or Games, will never truly be comparable.

Slopestyle

Each slopestyle run is scored by a team of nine judges. Three of those judges are responsible for evaluating each run based on overall impression. The remaining judges are split into three groups of two, with each group responsible for evaluating tricks done on specific sections of the course.

Final scores are out of 100, made up of the following components: 

  • 60% trick scores
  • 40% overall impression 

Although FIS rules allow different sections to be weighted disproportionately, it is common for contests using this method to value all sections equally.

The maximum number of points that can be awarded would be the same for a rail section at the top of the course as it would be for a giant booter at the bottom, placing emphasis on a well-rounded run, rather than one or two big jump tricks. Because many slopestyle courses have six sections, usually three jumps and three rail sections, that would make each section worth 10% of the overall score, with each trick in the run receiving a score of up to 10.0 points.

In giving their marks, judges consider several different criteria, including: 

  • Amplitude: In slopestyle, amplitude is not just gaining the most height or distance possible, but landing at the decided “sweet spot.” To have too much or too little amplitude on kickers can be dangerous and will be taken into account by the judges. 
  • Difficulty: The technical difficulty of tricks is assessed. Generally speaking, tricks with more rotation are considered more technically difficult and will be rewarded as such. But there are other ways riders can increase the difficulty of a particular trick. For example, an athlete may decide to take off or land switch when executing a trick, spin a frontside rotation off their toes instead of their heels, or do a more challenging grab to differentiate themselves from other riders in the field. 
  • Variety: Riders are expected to showcase a diverse mix of tricks. One of the most important ways a rider can show variety is in the way they spin when executing tricks. There are four possible directions in which a snowboarder can spin: frontside, backside, switch frontside (most commonly called "cab") and switch backside. (In other words, athletes can either spin frontside or backside, and they can do this while riding either forward or switch.) Most slopestyle courses feature 3-4 jumps, so athletes will often map out their runs in a way that allows them to perform a different spin on each jump. Another way that riders can show variety is in their grabs. Rather than doing the same grab on every single trick, athletes will frequently mix it up. 
  • Execution: This refers to the stability, fluidity and control of the tricks performed. Were the grabs held properly and for a long enough period of time? How smooth were the landings? Did the rider drag their hand across the ground at any point? How much "style" was evident in the run? These are all among the considerations of the judges. 
  • Progression: Riders are rewarded for introducing new tricks or for linking together tricks in a way that has never been done before.

There is no true universal consensus on "deductions" or how to determine an exact score. More than anything, scores are a means to an end – a way for judges to accurately position athletes on the leaderboard. Scoring is based on how athletes stack up against each other on that particular day, rather than being based on a strict mathematical formula or even past history.

For example, the very first athlete to compete might sometimes receive what's deemed to be a "low" score, relatively speaking. This is simply because judges, who have to evaluate the run they just witnessed against theoretical runs they think might occur later on, need to leave themselves cushioning to account for other competitors — in other words, you will likely never see a rider score a perfect 100 unless they are the final athlete to take a run. Because of this, scores from two different contests, whether it's between rounds or Games, will never truly be comparable.

Big Air

Each big air run is scored by a team of six judges. After dropping the highest and lowest scores, the four remaining scores are averaged together for each run. 

All judges score each attempt on a scale ranging from 1-100. Scoring for big air contests is based off the D-E-A-L criteria: 

  • Difficulty: The technical difficulty of tricks is assessed. Generally speaking, tricks with more rotation are considered more technically difficult and will be rewarded as such. But there are other ways riders can increase the difficulty of a particular trick. For example, an athlete may decide to take off or land switch when executing a trick, spin a frontside rotation off their toes instead of their heels, or do a more challenging grab to differentiate themselves from other riders in the field. Progressive tricks that other riders aren't doing will be rewarded. 
  • Execution: Control should be maintained throughout the whole trick, from take-off to landing. Grabs should be held properly and for as long as possible. 
  • Amplitude: In big air, amplitude is not just about how "big" the athlete goes, but also landing the trick in the decided "sweet spot." To have too much or too little amplitude on the jump can be dangerous and will be taken into account by the judges. 
  • Landing: Riders must land with full control, with the trick already completed (i.e. no reverts, no hand drags).